SCM14: Debates in AKI

Debates in AKI

The meeting got off to a rousing start this morning with an epic matchup: Claudio Ronco took on challenger Steven Coca on the issue of whether a rise in serum creatinine is (Ronco) or is not (Coca) a bad thing in acute decompensated heart failure.  Dr. Ronco presented a convincing case that rising creatinine is not just ‘pre-renal’ azotemia any more, but is rather a conflagration of insults, hormonal perturbations, and inflammation that portends real damage rather than hemodynamic fluctuation.  Dr. Coca took the stage, armed with data and chutzpah, to show that perhaps the rise in creatinine we see in ADHF is in fact a mark of ‘acute renal success’ rather than of acute renal failure — that for many people in whom this occurs it is because of beneficial therapeutic manipuations (diuretics, ACE, decongestion) rather than an innate deterioriation of function.  People who are successfully decongested and have a rise in creatinine in that setting (and other evidence of volume removal) do better than those who are not decongested (and who, not coincidentally, do not have a rise in creatinine).

The audience was on the edge of its seat as the votes were taken — while 10% initially favored Dr. Coca’s point of view, more than 25% did at the end.  Statistically and clinically significant?  Did David conquer Goliath, and will patients benefit in the end?  You decide.

Post written by Dr. Dena Rifkin, Feature Editor for AJKD’s In a Few Words.

Check out more eAJKD coverage of the NKF’s 2014 Spring Clinical Meetings!

1 Comment on SCM14: Debates in AKI

  1. Update from Dr. Rifkin:
    The initial score was Ronco 52%, Coca 10%.
    The final score was Ronco 22%, Coca 33%, with a larger fraction answering that it would depend.

1 Trackback / Pingback

  1. Recap of eAJKD’s coverage of the NKF’s 2014 Spring Clinical Meetings –

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s